Faculty/Staff


What Are the Different Types of Healthcare Information Technologies?

Healthcare in the age of technology, offers different tools for the consumer.

To prepare for healthcare technology, you have to understand what types of technology exist. For the individual, there are personal health tools, often in the form of wearables. It’s the FitBit that you’d have on your wrist, or other wearable devices – GPS trackers for example. It could be your smart phone. These include monitors and medical devices, such things as blood pressure cuffs, or other disease-state monitors to help you know what’s going on. And increasingly research tools, so you can go onto the internet and find out more and more about your medical state: go and see ‘Dr. Google’ to prepare you for the discussions with your caregiver.

Listen here:

This audio clip originally appeared on the Connecticut Business and Industry Association’s CBIA Business Minute.

 

Robert Booz

Robert Booz
Healthcare IT Faculty, Healthcare Management & Insurance Studies
Robert H. Booz is a healthcare professional with extensive experience in policy analysis, business operations, and technology enablement. Author of over 125 research articles and having conducted over 2,000 client one-on-one inquiries, his strengths are analyzing the current challenges, emerging trends, and future opportunities of healthcare and the vendors that support them. He has been teaching at UConn for more than 15 years. View Posts


Which Industries Benefit from Healthcare Information Technology?

Health insurers can use HIT to help keep premium costs down, but other industries also benefit from healthcare IT advances:

For medical care providers – HIT is good because it creates greater personalization, and it allows for more consistency in the way health is treated.

For pharmaceutical and supplier organizations – it gives them both retrospective and prospective analysis of a disease state, and allows them to have the right mix of products and services across different disease states.

For research organizations – it provides them data across a variety of circumstances; and

For technology companies who are designing new tools, it gives them business opportunities to pursue.

Listen here:

This audio clip originally appeared on the Connecticut Business and Industry Association’s CBIA Business Minute.

 

Robert Booz

Robert Booz
Healthcare IT Faculty, Healthcare Management & Insurance Studies
Robert H. Booz is a healthcare professional with extensive experience in policy analysis, business operations, and technology enablement. Author of over 125 research articles and having conducted over 2,000 client one-on-one inquiries, his strengths are analyzing the current challenges, emerging trends, and future opportunities of healthcare and the vendors that support them. He has been teaching at UConn for more than 15 years. View Posts


Why Does Healthcare Information Technology Matter?

Healthcare Information Technology enables the patient to affect their own health, from personal research to early prevention, to effective treatment.

It matters to the individual, because technology will give them new tools and new ways of thinking about themselves. It helps them with their personal research, with concurrent state monitoring–in other words: knowing what’s going on, and finally prevention through early detection. It matters for a patient because it allows them to lower their personal healthcare costs and improve their outcomes. And for the employer, it lowers their premium expenses allowing its employees to be more productive.

Listen here:

 
This audio clip originally appeared on the Connecticut Business and Industry Association’s CBIA Business Minute.

 

Robert Booz

Robert Booz
Healthcare IT Faculty, Healthcare Management & Insurance Studies
Robert H. Booz is a healthcare professional with extensive experience in policy analysis, business operations, and technology enablement. Author of over 125 research articles and having conducted over 2,000 client one-on-one inquiries, his strengths are analyzing the current challenges, emerging trends, and future opportunities of healthcare and the vendors that support them. He has been teaching at UConn for more than 15 years. View Posts


What is Healthcare Information Technology?

Healthcare is on the forefront of technology.

Healthcare information technology, or HIT, is the use of computers to enable tools through the course of healthcare. It’s trying to figure out, ‘how can we make things more consistent, better, and more able to help patients?’

Technology is found in four unique attributes of healthcare:

  • Diagnosis – “What’s wrong with me?”
  • Treatment – “What do I do about it?”
  • Prevention – “How do I keep it from happening again, or, just happening at all?” and finally:
  • Health Information Analysis – “What does this mean for the course of healthcare?”

If you do all four things, you can fundamentally affect your own health.

Listen here:

This audio clip originally appeared on the Connecticut Business and Industry Association’s CBIA Business Minute.

 

Robert Booz

Robert Booz
Healthcare IT Faculty, Healthcare Management & Insurance Studies
Robert H. Booz is a healthcare professional with extensive experience in policy analysis, business operations, and technology enablement. Author of over 125 research articles and having conducted over 2,000 client one-on-one inquiries, his strengths are analyzing the current challenges, emerging trends, and future opportunities of healthcare and the vendors that support them. He has been teaching at UConn for more than 15 years. View Posts



Swimming with Sharks

crowdfunding

New Crowdfunding Rules Let Small Investors Join a Riskier League

New rules from the Securities and Exchange Commission, which took effect May 16, 2016, open many doors for “ordinary people” to invest in start-ups and other small businesses.

The issuers of the securities that they invest in will not need to affirm the investors’ financial sophistication nor provide them with audited financial statements. The underlying law was signed four years ago, but it has taken a while for the SEC to write the rules, all 685 pages of them.  Continue Reading


How to Thrive and Gain Respect in Your First Job

Respect in the Workplace
Earning respect in the workplace is a give-and-take process. Ask good questions, look for good times to speak up, be patient, listen and learn.

Many UConn seniors and new graduates are focused on landing that first full-time job. And once the job starts, there are many new and exciting experiences. Colleagues want you to feel welcome, and take the time to show you how things get done.

Before long, though, the honeymoon period ends and a new challenge sets in. You don’t just want your colleagues to welcome you – you want them to respect the value that you can add in the workplace. UConn helped you learn the skills you need to do your job, but it is only after graduation that you realize you have to showcase your abilities too. How do you do that? Continue Reading


History in the Making

Brexit

Brexit: People Had Enough With Distant Bureaucrats Telling Them What To Do

One of my enduring interests is research and teaching related to values-driven business. I jumped at the opportunity to teach a law and ethics course in London this summer with 14 bright UConn undergraduates. Such a program is filled with experiential education – we visited the US Embassy, the UK Supreme Court, Lloyd’s of London, and the Royal Society for the Arts, among other places.

Little did I know that our summer course would take place right in the middle of one of the most important events of modern Europe – the vote on whether the fifth-largest economy in the world would leave the European Union.

Continue Reading


Exploring Cuba

A typical neighborhood in Old Havana, Cuba.
A typical neighborhood in Old Havana, Cuba. Mo Hussein and Katherine Pancak visit Cuba as part of a faculty development program hosted by the University of Maryland.

Cubans are Friendly, Well-Educated, Entrepreneurial and Economically Challenged,  UConn Professors Discovered

This is a guest post by Katherine Pancak and Mohamed Hussein about their trip to Cuba in June.

After 54 years of estrangement, Cuba and the U.S have reestablished diplomatic relations.  While the longstanding trade embargo against Cuba has not yet been lifted, there is greater engagement between the two countries and the general feeling is that it is just a matter of time before normalized trade will resume. The improving relations have prompted people in both countries to reach out to each other so as to learn about each other. We had the opportunity to travel to Cuba as part of a faculty development program hosted by the University of Maryland Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER). Continue Reading